LUCKY CHARM

54,00 €

New product

An assortment of products associated with Greek superstitions, customs and traditions. Wish somebody with gouria (charms), xe-matiasma (evil-eye), or ptou skorda (garlic).

7 Items in the box:

  • Pocket lucky eye mirror,
  • Tomato and garlic sauce,
  • Greek Sea Salt
  • Komboloi Worry beads,
  • Olive Oil with garlic,
  • Lucky eye charm,
  • Greek lucky eye bracelet.

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More details

Items in the Box 7
Box Contents Pocket lucky eye mirror, Tomato and garlic sauce, Greek Sea Salt Komboloi Worry beads, Extra Virgin Olive Oil with garlic, Lucky eye charm, Greek lucky eye bracelet.

An assortment of products associated with Greek superstitions, customs and traditions. Wish somebody with gouria (charms), xe-matiasma (evil-eye), or ptou skorda (garlic).

7 Items in the box:

Pocket lucky eye mirror (View Image)
Breaking a mirror brings seven years of bad luck. This superstition has its origin in ancient Greece before mirrors were invented. In a form of divination, shallow bowls filled with water were used to tell a person’s future and any distortion meant bad news. The pocket lucky eye mirror is filled with lucky eyes on the back side. In the Greek culture there is a belief that the Matiasma will cause misfortune or injury. Matiasma means “evil eye” in Greek, and is often shortened to mati which means “eye”. The classic Greek “lucky eye” symbol charm aims to ward off the effects of the Matiasma. The multi-coloured pocket mirror has a 7.5 cm diameter. (Greek Tourism Excellence Award).

Tomato and garlic sauce (View Image)
Greeks believe the power of garlic to keep evil away. You may find braids of garlic, or a large individual head dangling in the entrances of shops, restaurants and homes. When Greeks exchange compliments they spit saying “ptou skorda” (skordo means garlic). With 15% garlic content, this sauce has the aroma & flavor of the garlic in complete balance with the tomato. This tomato and garlic sauce has been nominated with the UK Great Taste Award for its powerful, rich taste that you will enjoy in a vast array of ways. Enjoy with pizza, pasta, beans, gnocchi, grilled meats, casserole dishes, sandwiches, omelet, as a dip, as a condiment, on bruschetta etc.

Greek Sea Salt (View Image)
Given the enormous coastline of Greece, it is no surprise that salt has been a primitive source of food. “It values its weight in gold”, said the Ancient Greeks.
The “Fleur de Sel” is, after the evaporation of seawater, collected by hand from rocky puddles close to the Aegean shores. The natural sea salt contains 92 micro elements of vital importance. It is a valuable electrolyte for the body, in other words, it regulates the balance of liquids in the body. Half a teaspoon is enough for the meal of a family of four.

Komboloi - Worry beads (View Image)
Komboloi derives from the Greek words kombos which means “knot” and leo which means “say” as in “in every knot I say a prayer“. Its origins date back to time, when monks in Mount Athos began making strands of beads by tying knots on a string at regular intervals in order to say their prayers to God. Worry beads depict the Greek easy-going mentality. Most Greek men carry a komboloi with them at all times. One can hear komboloi’s flips and tricks in a busy kafeneion (cafe) downtown, where people play with their komboloi in different manners, thus letting go of their stress. Nowadays, the fact that the komboloi keeps your hands occupied, has been promoted as an excellent way to quit smoking.

Olive Oil with garlic (View Image)
Olive Oil from Crete island, infused with garlic aroma. More than 90% of the Cretan olive oil is extra virgin, which is the top-ranked classification category in the world. Greeks believe the power of garlic to keep evil away. When they exchange compliments they spit saying “ptou skorda” (skordo means garlic). Use this aromatic extra virgin olive oil to spice up your pasta sauce, boost the flavor of your raw or boiled salads, use it on garlic bread for intensified flavor. This olive oil comes in a 250ml in dorica round glass bottle.

Lucky eye charm (View Image)
In the Greek culture there is a belief that the Matiasma will cause misfortune or injury. Matiasma means “evil eye” in Greek, and is often shortened to mati which means “eye”. The classic Greek “lucky eye” symbol charm aims to ward off the effects of the Matiasma. Blue charms shaped like eyes worn on a necklace or a bracelet “reflect” the evil. The lucky eye is the most commonly talked about ancient superstition in the Greek Isles. The Greek Orthodox Church also believes in the “evil eye”, and they refer to it as “Vaskania”.

Greek lucky eye bracelet (View Image)
Celebrate Greek Culture with a Greek lucky eye bracelet in the blue and white colours of the Greek flag.

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LUCKY CHARM

LUCKY CHARM

An assortment of products associated with Greek superstitions, customs and traditions. Wish somebody with gouria (charms), xe-matiasma (evil-eye), or ptou skorda (garlic).

7 Items in the box:

  • Pocket lucky eye mirror,
  • Tomato and garlic sauce,
  • Greek Sea Salt
  • Komboloi Worry beads,
  • Olive Oil with garlic,
  • Lucky eye charm,
  • Greek lucky eye bracelet.

Read more about items...

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